Category Archives: Individual and Family Health

What You Should Know If You or A Loved One Is Turning 65: A Medicare Primer

Medicare Supplement Plans

If you are getting close to your 65th birthday, you are likely preparing to enroll in Medicare. Enrolling in Medicare and figuring out how to decrease your out-of-pocket health care expenses can be daunting, but a Medicare supplement plan can do just that—save you money and provide peace of mind.

Original Medicare, which consists of Medicare Part A and Part B, typically does not cover all of an individual’s health care costs. In order to fill the gap, many individuals purchase a Medicare supplement plan. Medicare supplement plans, also known as Medigap policies, are policies that can be purchased to cover expenses that Medicare does not pay.

The most common supplemental plans provide coverage for the out-of-pocket expenses that are not paid by Medicare, such as copays, deductibles, coinsurance, as well as some services that may not be covered by Medicare, such as international travel emergencies. Plans vary, so look for a plan that provides the coverage you need.

Eligibility

In order to be eligible for Medicare supplement plans, you must be enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B, and you cannot be enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan. If you are under 65 and receive Medicare as part of your disability benefits, you may be eligible to purchase a Medicare supplement plan depending on the state in which you live. In addition, only one person can be covered by each Medicare supplement plan. You will need to purchase separate policies if both you and your spouse want this type of coverage.

When to Enroll

The ideal time to purchase a Medicare supplement plan is during your Medigap open enrollment period. This is the six-month period beginning on the first day of the month that you turn age 65 or older and enroll in Medicare Part B. During this period, you will not be denied coverage for any pre-existing health conditions. In other words, you can purchase a Medicare supplement plan of your choice for the same premium that a healthy person without pre-existing conditions would pay. If you do not enroll in a Medicare supplement plan during your Medigap open enrollment period, you will not be guaranteed coverage, and you may potentially be denied coverage or charged a higher premium due to your medical history or pre-existing health conditions.

How to Purchase

Medicare supplement plans are sold by private insurance companies, and you will usually pay a monthly premium. Insurance companies selling Medicare supplement plans do not need to adhere to the same requirements as standard Medicare policies. This means that the cost of Medicare supplement plans can vary due to a number of factors, including the plan’s service area, your age when you enrolled in Medicare or your age when you enroll in a Medicare supplement plan. Because premiums and out-of-pocket costs can vary, it is a good idea to have your broker help you shop around. He or she can ensure you find the best rate and policy to suit your needs.

For more information or help finding the right Medicare supplement policy for you, contact your CIBC of Illinois, Inc. representative. We have Medicare Specialists on staff, ready to provide the right Medicare solution for you or your family. Don’t fall into cookie-cutter options!

This Know Your Benefits article is provided by CIBC of Illinois, Inc. and is to be used for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of an insurance professional. Visit us at http://www.cibcinc.com.

Employee Benefits Update from CIBC of Illinois, Inc.

Agencies Plan to Issue Final Rules for SBC Requirements

On March 31, 2015, the Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Treasury (Departments) issued Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) announcing their intention to issue final regulations for the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) summary of benefits and coverage (SBC) and uniform glossary requirement. These regulations will finalize the proposed regulations from Dec. 22, 2014.

The ACA requires these disclosure tools—the SBC and uniform glossary—to help consumers compare available coverage options. The requirement to provide them applies to both grandfathered and non-grandfathered plans.

Health plan issuers must provide the SBC to applicants and enrollees free of charge. The SBC is a concise document that provides simple and consistent information about health plan benefits and coverage.

The final regulations are expected to be released in the near future and will apply for plan years beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2016 (including open enrollment periods in fall of 2015 for coverage beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2016).

The updated template and related documents, including sample language and instructions, for the SBC and uniform glossary will not be issued until January 2016. The updated template will then apply for plan years beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2017. Until further guidance is issued, the previously updated template provided on the DOL’s website on April 23, 2014, continues to be authorized.

The March 31 FAQ guidance leaves a lot of uncertainty for employers in regard to their SBC documents. The changes included in the final regulations may require health plans to update their SBC documents before the new template is released.

The forthcoming final regulations may address this issue. In some cases, the Departments have provided temporary enforcement safe harbors when guidance is not issued sufficiently in advance of an effective date. However, at this time, no safe harbors or other relief has been provided on this issue.

Plan Offerings Now Diverging by Group Size

A new trend of health plan offerings has emerged over the past few years. Group size appears to be a determining factor in whether employers are offering more generous health plans or working on implementing more cost-sharing strategies for health benefits.

Large organizations—with more than 500 lives—tend to offer generous health plans, likely in an effort to use their benefits packages as recruiting and retention tools in a market that is becoming increasingly fierce.

Smaller groups are cutting back on benefits and using cost-sharing efforts with employees. This trend of leaner benefits with smaller groups is likely an effort to bring down expenses associated with rising health care costs and other costs related to the ACA.

For more information on how your benefits offerings compare to other employers, contact CIBC of Illinois, Inc. for benchmarking information.

DID YOU KNOW?

On May 4, 2015, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released Revenue Procedure 2015-30 to announce the inflation-adjusted limits for health savings accounts (HSAs) for calendar year 2016.

The following limits apply for 2016:

  • The HSA contribution limit is $3,350 for self-only and $6,750 for family.
  • The minimum deductible for high deductible health plans (HDHPs) is $1,300 for self-only and $2,600 for family.
  • The maximum out-of-pocket for HDHPs is $6,550 for self-only and $13,100 for family.

HR Briefing from CIBC of Illinois: May 2015

Supreme Court Issues Ruling in Pregnancy Discrimination Case

On March 25, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a former employee of United Parcel Service (UPS). The employee was faced with the choice to either continue working her labor-intensive job during pregnancy or take unpaid leave.

In its Young v. UPS decision, the Supreme Court held that the employee should be given the opportunity to prove that UPS violated the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) by not providing her the same light-duty accommodation that was given to other UPS employees who were considered injured or disabled. The PDA requires that women affected by pregnancy, childbirth or a related medical condition be treated the same for all employment-related purposes as “other persons not so affected but similar in their ability or inability to work.”

The employee in this case, Peggy Young, worked as a part-time driver for UPS. In 2006, Young became pregnant and was advised by her doctor that she should not lift more than 20 pounds. However, UPS required drivers to be

able to lift up to 70 pounds and denied Young’s lifting restriction.

Young sued UPS, alleging that it violated the PDA because it had a light-duty policy for other types of workers, including those who were injured on the job or disabled under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), but not for pregnant workers. UPS argued that it treated her as it would treat other relevant individuals and therefore did not discriminate against her based on pregnancy.

In 2008, the ADA’s definition of “disability” was expanded, requiring employers to accommodate employees with temporary lifting restrictions originating outside of work. In 2014, the EEOC also issued guidance requiring employers that provide light-duty assignments to employees who are unable to perform their full duties to make similar accommodations for pregnant employees. Many employers may have already changed their policies in light of this guidance.

The Supreme Court sent the case to the lower court for further review and also outlined standards for PDA cases. An individual may show discrimination by showing that her employer did not accommodate her while pregnant but did accommodate others who are similar “in their ability or inability to work.”

The decision is a victory for pregnant workers because it establishes an easier framework to prove illegal discrimination. Employers should review their policies to make sure that they do not discriminate against pregnant workers in violation of applicable laws. A significant factor in determining whether discrimination occurred will be if the employer accommodates a large percentage of nonpregnant workers while failing to accommodate a large percentage of pregnant workers.

HR Summertime Checklist

Employers and HR departments that take time to prepare for the summer months may be able to enjoy them a bit more. Now is a good time to start considering the employee management areas outlined below to ensure a smooth summer. Think about how each area impacts your organization and whether any action should be taken.

PTO/Vacation Requests – Do managers and supervisors know how to administer employee requests to make sure appropriate staffing levels are maintained and employees are treated fairly?

Summer Hours – Will your company begin or continue a “summer hours” policy? Will it be company-wide?

Dress Code – Does your company allow for a more relaxed dress code during the summer? How long does this last?

Staffing – Are you a seasonal employer who should start hiring for the summer? Are there layoffs to be administered prior to summer? Will you be hiring interns?

Of course, the above is not an all-inclusive list and each organization is unique. Think about what the summertime season means for your organization and get prepared.

DID YOU KNOW?

Many employers have implemented wellness programs to control health care costs. However, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has filed several lawsuits against employer-sponsored wellness programs it says violate the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA).

Until more clear guidance is available, you should take note of the issues highlighted in the EEOC cases. Specifically, you should review your wellness plan to ensure participation is voluntary and that employees are not excessively penalized for refusing to participate. In addition, you should evaluate whether the information collected about employees is protected under the ADA, GINA or any other employment benefit law.

For help with any part of the Employee Benefits spectrum, call us today at 877-936-3580.

Q1 2015 Benefits Bulletin: A Look Back, and Ahead

From CIBC of Illinois

IRS Invites Comments on Cadillac Tax Implementation

On Feb. 23, 2015, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Notice 2015-16 to describe potential approaches for a number of issues related to the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) so-called Cadillac tax. The IRS is seeking comments as it begins developing guidance for the implementation of the Cadillac tax. Public comments may be submitted to the IRS until May 15, 2015.

Proposed or final regulations have not yet been issued on the ACA’s Cadillac tax provision. This notice is intended to invite comment as guidelines are assembled, and taxpayers should not rely on the information provided in Notice 2015-16.

Cadillac Tax Overview

The Cadillac tax will go into effect beginning in 2018. This provision imposes a 40 percent excise tax on high-cost group health coverage. The Cadillac tax is intended to encourage companies to choose lower-cost health plans for their employees.

The Cadillac tax provision is found in Internal Revenue Code Section 4980I. This provision taxes the amount of an employee’s “excess benefit.” The excess benefit is the amount by which the monthly cost of an employee’s employer-sponsored health coverage exceeds the annual limitation.

For 2018, the statutory dollar limits are:

  • $10,200 per employee for self-only coverage; and
  • $27,500 per employee for other-than-self-only coverage.

The tax amount for each employee’s coverage will be calculated by the employer and paid by the coverage provider.

The Cadillac tax applies to “applicable employer-sponsored coverage” (both insured and self-insured). Applicable employer-sponsored coverage is coverage under any group health plan made available to the employee by the employer, which is excludable from the employee’s gross income under Code Section 106.

Applicable coverage also includes health flexible spending accounts (FSAs), health savings accounts (HSAs), on-site medical clinics, retiree coverage, multiemployer plans and coverage only for a specified disease or illness and hospital indemnity or other fixed indemnity insurance (if paid on a pretax basis or if a Section 162(l) deduction is allowed).

 

DOL Issues Final Rule to Expand FMLA Protections for Same-sex Spouses

The Department of Labor (DOL) has issued a final rule that will expand rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) for same-sex spouses. Under the final rule, eligible employees in legal same-sex marriages will be able to take FMLA leave in order to care for their spouses or family members, regardless of where they live.

The DOL’s new guidance is effective March 27, 2015, and it replaces guidance regarding FMLA protections for same-sex spouses that was issued following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor.

The final rule changes the definition of “spouse” under the FMLA as follows:

Adopts a “place of celebration” rule (which is based on where the marriage was entered into), instead of the “state of residence” rule that applied under prior DOL guidance; and

  • Expressly includes same-sex marriages in addition to common law marriages, and encompasses same-sex marriages entered into abroad that could have been entered into in at least one state.

This change will impact FMLA leave in several ways. Specifically, the definitional change means that eligible employees, regardless of where they live, will be able to:

  • Take FMLA leave to care for their same-sex spouses with serious health conditions;
  • Take qualifying exigency leave due to their same-sex spouses’ covered military service; or
  • Take military caregiver leave for their same-sex spouses.

In connection with the final rule, the DOL also issued a set of frequently asked questions (FAQs) to help employers and employees understand the changes to the FMLA’s definition of “spouse.”

To comply with the final rule, employers should review and update their FMLA policies and procedures as necessary. Employers should also train employees who are involved in the leave management process on the expanded eligibility rules for same-sex spouses under the FMLA.

DOJ to Allow Claims Based on Gender Identity Discrimination

On Dec. 18, 2014, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced a reversal of its position regarding whether discrimination based on sex incudes discrimination based on an individual’s gender identity and transgender status.

The DOJ has now taken the position that discrimination based on sex includes discrimination based on an individual’s gender identity and transgender status.

Although the DOJ’s authority to file discrimination lawsuits is limited to government employers, this announcement solidifies the federal government’s position on gender identity rights.

Background Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin when making employment decisions. In 2006, the DOJ took the position that discrimination based on sex excluded discrimination based on an individual’s gender identity or transgender status. The DOJ has now reversed this position.

Gender identity is an individual’s internal sense of being male or female. An individual’s internal identification may or may not correspond to the individual’s biological gender. Transgender individuals are people with a gender identity that is different from the sex assigned to them at birth.

Effect on Employers Employers can expect to see more individuals file claims based on gender identity discrimination and increased federal support for employee protections against discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation.

Employers should review their employment policies to ensure that they are compliant with federal, state and local anti-discrimination regulations.

New Guidance and Relief for Employer Payment of Individual Premiums

Under the ACA, employer payment plans do not comply with several provisions that took effect beginning in 2014. Violations of these rules can result in excise taxes of $100 per day for each employee.

An employer payment plan is an arrangement where an employer reimburses or pays premiums for an employee’s individual health insurance.

New Guidance on Employer Payments
The Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Treasury have released several pieces of guidance clarifying the rules regarding these arrangements. The IRS issued Notice 2015-17 on Feb. 18, 2015, providing further clarification.

Specifically, this notice provides information on several related issues:

  • Reiterates that employer payment plans are group health plans that will fail to comply with the ACA’s market reforms applicable to group health plans;
  • Clarifies that increases in employee compensation do not constitute an employer payment plan, as long as the increases are not conditioned on the purchase of individual health coverage;
  • Provides transition relief from the excise tax for employer payment plans sponsored by small employers (those not subject to the ACA’s employer shared responsibility rules) and to S corporation health care arrangements for 2-percent shareholder-employees;
  • Addresses whether employers may reimburse employees for Medicare or TRICARE premiums for active employees under the ACA; and
  • States that employer payments for individual premiums can be excludable from an employee’s income under the tax code but will still violate the ACA’s market reforms.

Employers should review their benefit and compensation plans and policies to ensure they are not in violation of current guidance regarding employer payment plans.

The information contained in this newsletter is not intended as legal or medical advice. Please consult a professional for more information.

Affordable Care Act Update: Subsidy Certifications Explained

Certifications of Employee Eligibility for Subsidies

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires health insurance Exchanges to send a notice to employers regarding employees who purchase coverage through an Exchange and qualify for a health insurance subsidy. These notices are also called “Section 1411 Certifications” because the notice requirement is contained in Section 1411 of the ACA.

The Section 1411 Certification is part of the process established by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for verifying that only eligible individuals receive health insurance subsidies. Both state-run and federally facilitated Exchanges are required to send these certifications to employers. For 2015, it is expected that HHS will issue the certifications in batches, beginning in spring 2015.

These certifications are not directly related to the ACA’s shared responsibility rules for applicable large employers (ALEs). Starting in 2016, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will contact ALEs to inform them of their potential liability for a shared responsibility penalty for 2015, and it will provide them with an opportunity to respond. Employers that receive certifications may appeal a subsidy determination to help ensure, as much as possible, that employees are not mistakenly receiving subsidies. Appealing subsidy determinations may also help limit an ALE’s potential liability for a shared responsibility penalty.

affected employers

The Exchanges are required to provide the certifications to all employers with employees who purchase coverage through an Exchange and qualify for a health insurance subsidy. This includes ALEs that are subject to the ACA’s shared responsibility rules and small employers that do not qualify as ALEs. Also, for efficiency reasons, Exchanges can either send the certifications on an employee-by-employee basis as subsidy determinations are made, or the Exchanges can send the certifications to employers for a group of employees.

health insurance subsidies

There are two federal health insurance subsidies available for coverage purchased through an Exchange—premium tax credits and cost-sharing reductions. Both of these subsidies vary in amount based on the taxpayer’s household income, and they both reduce the out-of-pocket costs of health insurance for the insured.

  • Premium tax credits are available for people with somewhat higher incomes (up to 400 percent of the federal poverty level), and they reduce out-of-pocket premium costs for the taxpayer.
  • Reduced cost-sharing is available for individuals who qualify to receive the premium tax credit and have lower incomes (up to 250 percent of the federal poverty level). Through cost-sharing reductions, these individuals have lower out-of-pocket costs at the point of service (for example, lower deductibles and copayments).

To be eligible for a health insurance subsidy, a taxpayer:

  • Must have a household income for the year between 100 percent and 400 percent of the federal poverty level for the taxpayer’s family size,
  • May not be claimed as a dependent of another taxpayer,
  • Must file a joint return if married,
  • Cannot be eligible for minimum essential coverage (Government or employer sponsored plan).

 

An employee who may enroll in an employer-sponsored plan, and individuals who may enroll in the plan because of a relationship with the employee, are generally considered eligible for minimum essential coverage if the plan is affordable and provides minimum value.

The requirements of affordability and minimum value do not apply if an employee actually enrolls in any employer-sponsored minimum essential coverage, including coverage provided through a cafeteria plan, a health FSA or an HRA, but only if the coverage does not consist solely of excepted benefits. Thus, if an employee enrolls in any employer-sponsored minimum essential coverage, the employee is ineligible for a subsidy.

section 1411 certification

The ACA directed HHS to establish a program for verifying whether an individual meets the eligibility standards for receiving an Exchange subsidy. As part of this verification process, an Exchange must notify the employer when it determines that an employee is eligible for subsidized coverage.

Final regulations issued by HHS on March 27, 2012, specify the content requirements for the Section 1411 Certifications.

Here is a key point:

Employees who are eligible for employer-sponsored coverage that is affordable and provides minimum value are not eligible for a subsidy. This is significant because the ACA’s shared responsibility penalty for ALEs is triggered when a full-time employee receives a subsidy for coverage under an Exchange. An employee who is not eligible for a subsidy may still be eligible to enroll in a health plan through an Exchange. However, this would not result in a shared responsibility penalty for the employer.

 

section 1411 certification

The ACA directed HHS to establish a program for verifying whether an individual meets the eligibility standards for receiving an Exchange subsidy. As part of this verification process, an Exchange must notify the employer when it determines that an employee is eligible for subsidized coverage.

Final regulations issued by HHS on March 27, 2012, specify the content requirements for the Section 1411 Certifications.

 

section 1411 certification

The ACA directed HHS to establish a program for verifying whether an individual meets the eligibility standards for receiving an Exchange subsidy. As part of this verification process, an Exchange must notify the employer when it determines that an employee is eligible for subsidized coverage.

Final regulations issued by HHS on March 27, 2012, specify the content requirements for the Section 1411 Certifications.

Section 1411 Certifications must: ·          Identify the employee;·          Provide that the employee has been determined to be eligible for advance payments of a health insurance subsidy;·          Indicate that, if the employer has 50 or more full-time employees, the employer may be liable for a penalty under Code Section 4980H; and

·          Describe the employer’s appeal rights.

appeal rights

When an employer receives a certification regarding an employee’s eligibility for an Exchange subsidy, the employer may appeal the determination to correct any information about the health coverage it offers to employees. The appeals process can help:

  • Minimize the employee’s potential liability to repay advance payments of the subsidy that he or she was not eligible to receive; and
  • Protect the employer from being incorrectly assessed with a tax penalty under the shared responsibility rules (if the employer is an ALE). If the appeal is successful and the employee does not receive an Exchange subsidy, the employee cannot trigger penalties for an ALE under the shared responsibility rules.

Final regulations issued by HHS on Aug. 30, 2013, established general parameters for the employer appeal process. A state-run Exchange may have its own appeals process or it may follow the federal appeals process established by HHS. In either case, the Exchange must:

  • Give employers at least 90 days from the date of the Exchange notice to request an appeal;
  • Allow employers to submit relevant information to support the appeal;
  • Not limit or interfere with an employer’s right to make an appeal request; and
  • Accept appeal requests made by telephone, by mail, via the Internet or in person (if the Exchange is capable of receiving in-person appeal requests) and provide assistance in making the appeal request if this assistance is needed.

The appeals entity must provide written notice of the appeal decision within 90 days of the date the appeal request is received, if administratively feasible.

 

Another key point:

HHS’ final regulations clarify that an appeals decision in favor of the employee’s eligibility for a subsidy does not foreclose any appeal rights the employer may have for a penalty assessment under Code Section 4980H. Thus, while ALEs that receive certifications may appeal a subsidy determination to help ensure, as much as possible, that employees are not mistakenly receiving subsidies, they are not required to appeal a subsidy determination to preserve their rights to appeal an IRS assessment of a penalty tax.

Also, employers may develop policies to allow an employee to enroll in employer-sponsored coverage outside an open enrollment period when the employee is determined to be ineligible for Exchange subsidies as a result of an employer appeal decision.

other employer considerations

To help avoid incorrect subsidy determinations, HHS encourages employers to educate their employees about the details of employer-sponsored health coverage. This includes information on whether their plans are affordable and provide minimum value. Employees enrolling in Exchange coverage will generally complete an Employer Coverage Tool that gathers information about the employers’ group health plans. HHS encourages employers to assist employees with their Exchange applications by providing information regarding the employer-sponsored coverage through the Employer Coverage Tool.

In addition, employers should remember that the ACA amended the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to include whistleblower protections for employees. Employees are protected from retaliation for reporting alleged violations of the ACA. Employees are also protected from retaliation for receiving a subsidy when enrolling in an Exchange plan. If an employer violates the ACA’s whistleblower protections, it may be required to reinstate the employee, as well as provide back pay (with interest), compensatory damages and attorney fees.

As always, contact us at 877-936-3580 for more information on this, or any other aspect of employee benefits and the Affordable Care Act.

 

Live Well, Work Well: A Monthly Employee Wellness Newsletter From CIBC of Illinois

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ACA Update: New Guidance and Relief for Employer Payment of Individual Premiums

In the past, many employers have helped employees pay for individual health insurance policies instead of offering an employer-sponsored plan. In recent months, the Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Treasury (Departments) have released several pieces of guidance addressing these arrangements.

The Departments’ guidance specifically addresses “employer payment plans,” under which an employer reimburses or pays premiums for an employee’s individual health insurance policy.

According to this guidance, employer payment plans do not comply with several ACA provisions that took effect beginning in 2014. Violations of these rules can result in excise taxes of $100 per day for each employee.

IRS Notice 2015-17

On Feb. 18, 2015, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Notice 2015-17. This notice:

  • Reiterates that employer payment plans are group health plans that will fail to comply with the ACA’s market reforms applicable to group health plans;
  • Clarifies that increases in employee compensation do not constitute an employer payment plan, as long as the increases are not conditioned on the purchase of individual health coverage;
  • Provides transition relief from the excise tax for employer payment plans sponsored by small employers (those not subject to the ACA’s employer shared responsibility rules) and to S corporation healthcare arrangements for 2-percent shareholder-employees;
  • Addresses whether employers may reimburse employees for Medicare or TRICARE premiums for active employees under the ACA; and
  • States that employer payments for individual premiums can be excludable from an employee’s income under the tax code, but will still violate the ACA’s market reforms.

The DOL and HHS have reviewed the notice and agree with the guidance provided. The Departments noted that they expect to issue further clarifications regarding other aspects of employer payment plans and HRAs in the near future.

Increases in Employee Compensation

Notice 2015-17 clarifies that, if an employer increases an employee’s compensation, but does not condition the additional compensation on the purchase of health coverage (or otherwise endorse a particular policy, form or issuer of health insurance), it is not considered an employer payment plan.

According to the IRS, providing employees with information about the Exchange or the premium tax credit is not endorsement of a particular policy, form or issuer of health insurance. Because this type of arrangement generally will not constitute a group health plan, it is not subject to the ACA’s market reforms.

Excise Tax Delay for Small Employers

Small employers have often helped employees pay for individual coverage. As noted above, these employers would normally be subject to an excise tax of $100 per day for each employee.

Notice 2015-17 provides a delay in the excise tax penalty for employers that are not applicable large employers (ALEs) under the ACA’s employer shared responsibility rules. These employers may need additional time to obtain group health coverage or to adopt a suitable alternative.

Therefore, an excise tax will not be assessed for violations of the ACA’s market reforms by certain employer payment plans that pay (or reimburse employees) for individual health policy premiums or Medicare Part B or Part D premiums.

This transition relief is available on a temporary basis. Employers may be eligible for relief from the excise tax as late as June 30, 2015. Specifically:

  • For 2014, the relief applies to employers that are not ALEs in 2014.
  • For Jan. 1 to June 30, 2015, the relief applies to employers that are not ALEs in 2015.

After June 30, 2015, these employers may be liable for the excise tax.

This relief does not extend to stand-alone HRAs or other arrangements that reimburse employees for medical expenses other than insurance premiums.

Employers eligible for this relief are not required to file IRS Form 8928 (regarding failures to satisfy requirements for group health plans) as a result of having these arrangements during the period for which the employer is eligible for the relief.

Reimbursement of Medicare and TRICARE Premiums

Notice 2015-17 notes that an arrangement under which an employer reimburses (or pays directly) some or all of Medicare Part B or Part D premiums for employees constitutes an employer payment plan. Similarly, an arrangement under which an employer reimburses (or pays directly) some or all of medical expenses for employees covered by TRICARE constitutes an HRA. In both cases, if the arrangement covers two or more active employees, it is a group health plan subject to the ACA’s market reforms.

An employer payment plan or an HRA may not be integrated with Medicare coverage or TRICARE to satisfy the market reforms, because Medicare coverage and TRICARE are not group health plans for integration purposes.

However, an employer payment plan or HRA that pays for or reimburses Medicare Part B or Part D premiums, or medical expenses for employees covered by TRICARE, is integrated with another group health plan offered by the employer for purposes of the market reforms if:

  • The employer offers a group health plan (other than the employer payment plan or HRA) to the employee that does not consist solely of excepted benefits and offers coverage providing minimum value;
  • The employee participating in the employer payment plan or HRA is actually enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B or TRICARE;
  • The employer payment plan or HRA is available only to employees who are enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B or Part D, or TRICARE; and
  • The employer payment plan or HRA is limited to reimbursement of Medicare Part B or Part D premiums, or cost-sharing, and excepted benefits, including Medigap premiums or TRICARE supplemental premiums.

Note that, to the extent that this type of arrangement is available to active employees, it may be subject to restrictions under other laws, such as the Medicare secondary payer provisions or laws that prohibit offering financial or other incentives for TRICARE-eligible employees to decline employer-provided group health plan coverage, similar to the Medicare secondary payer rules.

An employer payment plan that has fewer than two participants who are current employees (for example, a retiree-only plan) on the first day of the plan year is not subject to the market reforms, and, therefore, integration is not necessary to satisfy the market reforms.

Also, an employer may provide more than one type of healthcare arrangement for its employees (for example, a Medicare Part B employer payment plan and a TRICARE-related HRA), provided that each arrangement meets the applicable integration or other rules.

S Corporation Healthcare Arrangements for 2-percent Shareholder-employees

Under IRS Notice 2008-1, if an S corporation pays for (or reimburses) premiums for individual health insurance coverage covering a 2-percent shareholder, the payment or reimbursement is included in income, but the 2-percent shareholder-employee may deduct the amount of the premiums (provided that all other eligibility criteria for deductibility are satisfied). Notice 2015-17 refers to this as a 2-percent shareholder-employee healthcare arrangement.

The Departments stated that they may issue additional guidance on the application of the market reforms to a 2-percent shareholder-employee healthcare arrangement. However, until further guidance is issued (and at least through the end of 2015), the excise tax will not be assessed for any failure to satisfy the market reforms by a 2-percent shareholder-employee healthcare arrangement.

Furthermore, until additional guidance provides otherwise, an S corporation with a 2-percent shareholder-employee healthcare arrangement will not be required to file IRS Form 8928 (regarding failures to satisfy requirements for group health plans, including the market reforms) solely as a result of having a 2-percent shareholder-employee healthcare arrangement.

However, this guidance does not apply to reimbursements of individual health insurance coverage with respect to employees of an S corporation who are not 2-percent shareholders.

The IRS is also considering whether additional guidance is needed on the federal tax treatment of 2-percent shareholder-employee healthcare arrangements. However, until additional guidance provides otherwise, taxpayers may continue to rely on Notice 2008-1 with regard to the tax treatment of these arrangements for all federal income and employment tax purposes.

To the extent that a 2-percent shareholder is allowed both the deduction described above and a premium tax credit for coverage through an Exchange, Revenue Procedure 2014-41 provides guidance on calculating the deduction and the credit with respect to the 2-percent shareholder.

Notice 2015-17 also noted, however, that the market reforms do not apply to a group health plan that has fewer than two participants who are current employees on the first day of the plan year. Thus, an arrangement covering only a single employee (whether or not that employee is a 2-percent shareholder-employee) generally is not subject to the market reforms, whether or not the reimbursement arrangement otherwise constitutes a group health plan.

However, if an S corporation maintains more than one of these types of arrangements for different employees (whether or not 2-percent shareholder-employees), all are treated as a single arrangement covering more than one employee, so that this exception does not apply.

Employer Payment Plans under Code Sections 105 and 106

The notice also addresses Revenue Ruling 61-146 (Rev. Rul. 61-146), which has been cited by some as authority permitting employer payment plans under the tax code. Under Rev. Rul. 61-146, employer reimbursements of an employee’s individual insurance premiums are excluded from the employee’s gross income under Code Section 106. This exclusion also applies if the employer pays the premiums directly to the insurance company.

According to the IRS, this guidance regarding the tax exclusion continues to apply. This means only that the payments are excludable from the employee’s gross income under Section 106 (regardless of whether the employer includes the payments as wages on the Form W-2).

However, the IRS stated that Rev. Rul. 61-146 does not address the application of the ACA’s market reforms, and should not be read as containing any implication regarding the application of those market reforms.

An arrangement under which an employer provides reimbursements or payments that are dedicated to providing medical care (such as cash reimbursements for the purchase of an individual market policy) is, itself, a group health plan. Accordingly, the arrangement is subject to the ACA’s market reform rules applicable to group health plans, without regard to whether the employer treats the money as pre-tax or post-tax to the employee. These employer health care arrangements cannot be integrated with individual market policies to satisfy the market reforms and, therefore, do not comply with the ACA.

The notice supplements two Information Letters previously issued by the IRS Office of Chief Counsel. Letter 2014-0037 and Letter 2014-0039 addressed the ability of employers to reimburse employees’ medical expenses with pre-tax dollars under Code Section 105. These letters note that, although the ACA has not changed the tax treatment under Section 105 or 106, these arrangements violate the ACA’s prohibition on annual limits because they reimburse medical expenses up to a fixed amount.

Prior Employer Payment Plan Guidance

  • 24, 2013: Department FAQs addressed compliance of HRAs with the ACA’s market reforms.
  • 13, 2013: IRS Notice 2013-54 and DOL Technical Release 2013-03 clarified that HRAs, certain health FSAs and other employer payment plans are considered group health plans subject to the ACA’s market reforms, and they cannot be integrated with individual policies to satisfy those requirements. As a result, effective for 2014 plan years, these plans are essentially prohibited.
  • May 13, 2014: IRS FAQs addressed the consequences for employers that reimburse employees for individual health insurance premiums. These arrangements may trigger an excise tax of $100 per day for each applicable employee ($36,500 per year for each employee) under Code Section 4980D.
  • 6, 2014: Department FAQs clarified that employer payment plans do not comply with the ACA’s market reforms and may subject employers to penalties, whether provided on a pre- or after-tax basis.

CIBC of Illinois, Inc. Merges With Strategic Employee Benefit Services of Champaign

CIBC of Illinois, Inc. Merges With Strategic Employee Benefit Services of Champaign

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Kankakee, IL– (February 9, 2015)- William Johnson, Chairman and CEO of CIBC of Illinois, Inc. is pleased to announce the successful merger of CIBC of Illinois and Strategic Employee Benefit Services of Champaign (SEBS). The new organization will operate as CIBC of Illinois, Inc. and include offices in both Kankakee and Champaign.

“This is an extremely exciting development for both of our organizations,” said Johnson. “The expertise that CIBC possesses in the ever-changing world of employee benefits and group health insurance is exactly what businesses are demanding, and the SEBS connection to the Central and Southern Illinois markets is a great opportunity for us to deliver these solutions on a consistent basis. The synergies we gain via this new powerhouse organization will position CIBC as an industry-leader in both size and capabilities that we deliver to businesses.”

As a result of the merger, former SEBS Benefit Consultant Tony Johnston was named as President and Chief Operating Officer for both the Kankakee and Champaign offices, and Erin Beck remains as Chief Financial Officer for CIBC.

“This is a great opportunity for the SEBS team to further commit to the exciting business opportunity of employee benefits, “said Tony Johnston. “Our extensive client base will now have access to the cutting edge benefits knowledge, wellness resources, technology, and regulatory compliance that is requisite in the healthcare reform era.”

About CIBC of Illinois, Inc.

CIBC is a leader in the development and implementation of innovative employee benefits plans. Headquartered an hour south of Chicago in Kankakee and with a branch office in Champaign, CIBC serves private sector clients, non-profit organizations, governmental bodies and agencies and Taft-Hartley health and welfare funds across the Midwest. Over the past two decades, they have creatively addressed the employee benefits needs of hundreds of organizations — some with as few as two employees and others with as many as 25,000 employees around the globe.

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Individual Health Insurance: Reporting Coverage and Paying Penalties

A key provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the individual mandate, which requires most individuals to purchase health insurance coverage for themselves and their family members or pay a penalty.

Starting in 2015, individuals will have to report on their federal tax return whether they had health insurance coverage for 2014 or were exempt from the individual mandate. Any penalties that an individual owes for not having health insurance coverage will generally be assessed and collected in the same manner as taxes.

How will coverage be reported under the individual mandate?

Starting in 2015, when you file a federal tax return for 2014, you will have to:

  • Report that you, your spouse (if filing jointly) and any individual you claim as a dependent had health care coverage throughout 2014; or
  • Claim a coverage exemption from the individual mandate for some or all of 2014 and attach Form 8965; or
  • Pay an individual mandate penalty (called a shared responsibility payment) for any month in 2014 that you, your spouse (if filing jointly) or any individual you claim as a dependent did not have coverage and did not qualify for a coverage exemption.

If you and your dependents all had minimum essential coverage for each month of the tax year, you will indicate this on your 2014 tax return by simply checking a box on Form 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ; no further action is required.

If you obtained a coverage exemption from the Marketplace or you qualify for an exemption that you can claim on your return, you will file Form 8965, and attach it to your tax return.

For any month you or your dependents did not have coverage or a coverage exemption, you will have to make a shared responsibility payment. The amount of the payment due will be reported on Form 1040, Line 61, in the “Other Taxes” section, and on the corresponding lines on Form 1040A and 1040EZ.

Who is exempt from the individual mandate?

You may be exempt from the individual mandate penalty if you:

  • Cannot afford coverage
  • Have income below the federal income tax filing threshold
  • Are not a citizen, are not considered a national or are not lawfully present in the United States
  • Experience a gap in coverage for less than a continuous three-month period
  • Qualify as a religious conscientious objector
  • Are a member of a health care sharing ministry
  • Are a member of certain American Indian tribes
  • Are given a hardship exemption by the Department of Health and Human Services
  • Are incarcerated

How much will the individual mandate penalty cost me?

The penalty for not obtaining acceptable health care coverage is being phased in over a three-year period. The amount of the penalty is either your “flat dollar amount” or your “percentage of income amount”—whichever is greater.

For 2014, the annual penalty is either:

  • One percent of your household income that is above the tax return filing threshold for your filing status; or
  • Your family’s flat dollar amount, which is $95 per adult and $47.50 per child, limited to a family maximum of $285.

Your payment amount is capped at the cost of the national average premium for a bronze level health plan, available through the Marketplace in 2014. For 2014, the annual national average premium for a bronze level health plan available through the Marketplace is $2,448 per individual ($204 per month), but $12,240 for a family with five or more members ($1,020 per month).

Calculating your payment requires you to know your household income and your tax return filing threshold.

Household income is the adjusted gross income from your tax return plus any excludible foreign earned income and tax-exempt interest you receive during the taxable year. Household income also includes the adjusted gross incomes of all of your dependents who are required to file tax returns.

Tax return filing threshold is the minimum amount of gross income an individual of your age and filing status (for example, single, married filing jointly, head of household) must make to be required to file a tax return.

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